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Missing cat found over Vic border, 400km from Adelaide arrives home


A cat named Master Sox has arrived home to Adelaide after being found 400 kilometres away in Mildura, over the Victorian border.

The much-loved pet had been missing since January before his owners got a call out of the blue earlier this month.

HOW DID HE END UP IN MILDURA?

The seven-year-old cat was caught in a trap set up by a vet in Mildura, in Victoria’s northwest, after someone saw him wandering around a yard for a number of days.

Sophie McInnes and her parents, Carol and Jamie, had all but given up hope after the “cheeky” pet didn’t show up for dinner one night in January at their home in Glenelg South.

The family still have the cat’s mum who they fostered when she was pregnant and decided to keep Soxies, as he’s affectionately known, out of her litter of six.

“All of a sudden, we couldn’t find him,” Ms McInnes told news.com.au on September 11.

“He’s the friendliest cat, comes in, says hello, meow meow.

“We thought it was strange because he would always come to you.”

They searched the streets, went doorknocking, put up posters and scanned Facebook groups for lost pets, spurred on by one woman who found her pet after it was missing for four years.

Ms McInnes made countless trips around the suburb but by April, they thought the worst.

“He’s gone and not coming back,” she recounted.

She said she would answer calls from private numbers just in case someone had found him.

Eventually, “the microchip saved him”.

“Eight months later, we get a call and he’s in a different state,” Ms McInnes said.

“My mum rang me, she was in tears, and I could heard my dad crying in the background.

“She said: ‘They’ve got Sox.’

“I said: ‘What do you mean? Who? Mildura vet?’

“It was crazy. Now it’s getting him back.”

RELATED: NT border to open to Sydney residents from October

THE RESCUE MISSION

Ms McInnes said Sox must have been pinched.

“There is no way that a cat could’ve walked that far unless he’s a little Superman cat,” she told news.com.au.

“He had to have been taken and dumped because the condition he was found in, he wasn’t looked after.

“He was skinny, he has an abscess on his right paw, he was really frightened and very alert.”

However, the vet called on September 10 to say “he’s purring now” and – like many of us in COVID-19 lockdown – Sox has put on heaps of weight.

“We don’t know his story,” Ms McInnes said.

“I wish he could talk.”

RELATED: Grieving daughter escorted by police to see father’s coffin

The find was “bittersweet” as the family were faced with a “waiting game” as the border between South Australia and Victoria holds firm.

“People aren’t even able to get to see their dying relatives across the border, or go to funerals, how are we supposed to get a little cat back?” Ms McInnes said.

She said they had been peppered with suggestions to call police or border control but they are “not saying anything”.

“The vet is trying to see if they are able to drive to the border and we go down to the border, at Renmark or Yamba, and we just do a quick swap but you also have to do so much paperwork,” she said.

Since August 28, a 40km “travel buffer zone” has been in place for cross border communities in Victoria and South Australia.

RELATED: SA could open border to NSW, ACT as early as next week

Travellers from Victoria, other than approved categories of essential travellers, are not permitted to travel to South Australia.

In an update to news.com.au, Ms McInnes said she and her mum drove to Berri – 150 kilometres west of Mildura – on Tuesday morning to get their cat back.

“He was couriered to Berri from Mildura,” she said.

“He’s doing extremely well!

“Super happy, purring and full love even letting us play with him and getting lots of kisses!”

Ms McInnes said her mum is urging people to check their microchip details are up-to-date as her phone number had changed.

sarah.mcphee@news.com.au



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Local News - Victoria

Working from home has changed everything


Even before the “always on” office culture of email, text, WhatsApp, Zoom and Teams, I believed that putting in the hours and doing whatever it takes to get the job done was the key to success. This was instilled in me working in London in the 1990s where nobody batted an eyelid if you were still in the office at 3am or if you pulled an all-nighter. It wasn’t just expected, it was a badge of honour. How foolish that all seems now.

I will go back to the office one day soon and I cannot wait to see my colleagues and feel their energy.

I will go back to the office one day soon and I cannot wait to see my colleagues and feel their energy.Credit:iStock

I remember the managing director of my firm recording a video from her hospital bed days after giving birth (this was before phones had cameras). This video was proudly presented to a potential client as evidence that we were unstoppable as a business partner. Looking back, that was so inappropriate – sending a clear signal to the women in the firm that you had to be constantly “at work”.

Back here in Australia, this belief was only reinforced by working for 10 years in retail. If you’ve never worked in the industry you might be surprised to know that retail starts early: 7.30am starts are the norm and on a Monday everyone is on their toes to go over last week’s results – so needed to be up even earlier. And as the pressure grew in retail the hours extended later and later.

When I became a mother I moved to a four-day working week and was fully supported. But being “on” is in your DNA so I could never be away from the phone or email for more than 30 minutes – I could have missed something! Once again, not saving lives, just selling bananas.



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Seniors could be asked to sell family home under death tax


Baby Boomers could be asked to sell the family home when they die to pay for aged care costs under a new plan to slap an effective death tax on seniors to fund care.

Former Treasurer Peter Costello has urged the Morrison Government to consider an expanded pensioner loans scheme during his appearance today at the Royal Commission into Aged Care.

Under the proposal, seniors would be given the option of taking out a loan secured against the family home, that would then be sold when they died or other assets liquidated.

While some banks already offer reverse home loans, Mr Costello has called for debate on expanding a pensions loans scheme to use the family home as an asset that could be sold when a retiree dies to recover costs.

“I mean, financial products that can allow people to raise accommodation bonds against the family home, which is generally their greatest asset, I think there’s a much more scope for them and I think the Government could assist there,” Mr Costello said.

“The Government has a thing called the Pension Loan Scheme which it says is available. The private sector has what is called a reversible mortgage or equity drawdown mortgages.

“But I do think, you know, this is a classic area where those people that do use residential care and do have assets should be asked to make a contribution and guaranteed a return of their deaths.”

RELATED: Woman screwed by new tax plan

But Mr Costello stressed that informed consent was the key to the proposal so that family members understood the cost would ultimately come out of the estate.

“Even today, if you’re asked to put up an accommodation bond, you can raise that bond with your own house as security,” he said.

“I mean, the point I’d make is that I think people should do it knowingly and in advance and there should be products that allow them to do that during their lifetime. If you come around and try to take their assets after they’ve died, I think you can expect to run into a lot of opposition there.”

Mr Costello urged debate on the option as an extension of reforms he introduced during the Howard Government.

“I felt you were never going to be able to run residential aged care with the ageing of the population off the taxpayer alone and you had to get private money and we introduced what we then called accommodation bonds,” Mr Costello said.

But Australia’s longest serving Treasurer also raised the alarm that the red tape and forms to enter aged care were so complex that even he struggled with them.

“Now, the members of my family I have attempted to fill in these income and assets tests. You all ought to do them,” he said.

“I’m reasonably financially literate. I had a lot of trouble filling it in. I don’t know how a person going into a nursing home would ever be able to fill it in.

“We’re talking about people who might be 80 or 90 years of age. How do they do this? My suspicion is that a lot of them just don’t.”

RELATED: $20k mistake under-35s are making

Former Treasury secretary Ken Henry told the inquiry he still believed that a compulsory tax levy to fund aged care was necessary.

But he echoed Mr Costello’s concern about the complexity of the system.

“My principal source of discomfort is that the system overall is horribly complex and it contains a very high level of uncertainty for people,” Dr Henry said.

“People who are elderly, people who are vulnerable, people who are suffering emotional and psychological stress, many, of course, unfortunately are mentally impaired to some extent, too many have little or inadequate family support and they confront the aged care system knowing nothing about it, knowing that they have no real option but to throw themselves into the system because it’s quite simply impossible for them to continue to look after themselves.

“And they’re bewildered. This system is unsustainable. It’s underfunded, it’s under resourced and it will not be tolerated. In particular, it will not be tolerated by the Baby Boomers themselves when they find themselves in this system.”



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Panthers beat Parramatta 20-2 to clinch NRL home final, Bulldogs lose to Manly Sea Eagles


Penrith is guaranteed a home qualifying final for the first time in a decade after taking its winning streak to 13 matches with a 20-2 victory over Parramatta at Panthers Stadium.

Jarome Luai again starred at five-eighth with a try and an assist to help the Panthers dispatch the only team to have beaten them this year.

In truth, had it not been for Parramatta’s grit and a lack of finishing from Penrith, the Panthers could have won by a more significant margin.

They had 57 tackles on Parramatta’s line to the Eels’ six at the other end, and blew at least five try-scoring opportunities in the first half before scoring their first on the break.

The result was soured with Panthers hooker Apisai Koroisau and bench forward Spencer Leniu both suffering concussions and neither returning.

But regardless, it wraps up a top-two finish and a game at Panthers Stadium in week one of the finals, with their following finals match also certain to be in Sydney.

The minor premiership also now looks a mere formality, with a win over either the struggling North Queensland or Canterbury in the final two rounds enough to wrap up top spot.

Realistically though, the match against the Eels was as much as they were likely to be pushed before the finals and they still controlled it in its entirety.

Their back three of Dylan Edwards, Josh Mansour and Brian To’o totalled almost 700 run metres combined to set up their field position, while James Fisher-Harris played 78 minutes straight up front.

They had a ridiculous 72 per cent of the ball in early stages and should have scored at least five tries in the opening 35 minutes of the match.

Mansour was denied one when Stephen Crichton was controversially ruled to have knocked the ball on, while the centre put another into touch with Mansour unmarked.

Luai was held up once when he put the ball down on Blake Ferguson’s leg, while To’o went within a fingernail of scoring himself.

Moses Leota was one of several players to drop the ball on the line.

But somehow the Eels were the first to score via a penalty goal.

Finally though, the pressure told when Mansour crossed on the half-time siren from a Luai cut-out ball on the siren.

Liam Martin then put the game in the bag when he leapt high to mark a Nathan Cleary kick and get it down in the 56th minute, before Luai crossed at full-time.

The result means the Eels could finish the round fourth, and there is every chance they will meet the Panthers again in week one of the finals.

Bulldogs stuck at bottom of ladder

Canterbury, winless since July, has surrendered a 10-point advantage in a 32-20 loss to Manly on Friday night to remain anchored to the bottom of the ladder with two rounds remaining.

Up against heavyweights South Sydney and Penrith in the closing two rounds, the Bulldogs’ seventh straight defeat leaves Steve Georgallis’s battlers with forlorn hopes of hauling themselves out of the cellar.

Including 2002, when stripped of 37 competition points for salary cap breaches, it looms as only the third wooden spoon for the once-proud and mighty Canterbury club in 56 years.

A Manly Sea Eagles NRL player puts the ball down on the ground with his right hand as he scores a try next to the goal posts.
Taniela Paseka scored Manly’s opening try in their drought-breaking win over the Bulldogs.(AAP: Dean Lewins)

And the Bulldogs have only themselves to blame.

Facing a Manly outfit riding their own six-match losing streak, Canterbury led 10-0 on the half-hour mark courtesy of an early Matt Doorey try, Nick Meaney’s conversion and two penalty goals.

But the match soon turned in Manly’s favour, with interchange forward Taniela Paseka, Curtis Sironen, Brad Parker and Jack Gosiewski all scoring tries.

The four-try blitz in 13 minutes either side of half-time had Manly suddenly leading 22-10.

Halfback Lachie Lewis briefly raised hopes of a Bulldogs fightback with a try against the run of play in the 50th minute.

But tries Morgan Harper and Marty Taupau snuffed out the comeback to propel Manly into 10th spot on the ladder, four points adrift of eighth-placed Cronulla.

The Sea Eagles have the faintest of chances of playing finals football, as they need to win their remaining two matches against Gold Coast and the Warriors, and hope the Sharks record heavy defeats in their next three fixtures.

AAP/ABC



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Missing cat found over Victorian border, 400km from Adelaide home


A cat named Master Sox has been found eight months after he vanished from his Adelaide home.

But there’s just one problem – he’s 400 kilometres away in Mildura, over the Victorian border.

HOW DID HE END UP IN MILDURA?

The seven-year-old cat was caught in a trap this week set up by the vet in the regional city, in the state’s northwest, after someone saw him wandering around a yard for a number of days.

Sophie McInnes and her parents, Carol and Jamie, had all but given up hope after the “cheeky” pet didn’t show up for dinner one night in January at their home in Glenelg South.

The family still have the cat’s mum who they fostered when she was pregnant and decided to keep Soxies, as he’s affectionately known, out of her litter of six.

“All of a sudden, we couldn’t find him,” Ms McInnes told news.com.au on Friday.

“He’s the friendliest cat, comes in, says hello, meow meow.

“We thought it was strange because he would always come to you.”

They searched the streets, went doorknocking, put up posters and scanned Facebook groups for lost pets, spurred on by one woman who found her pet after it was missing for four years.

Ms McInnes made countless trips around the suburb but by April, they thought the worst.

“He’s gone and not coming back,” she recounted.

She said she would answer calls from private numbers just in case someone had found him.

Eventually, “the microchip saved him”.

“Eight months later, we get a call and he’s in a different state,” Ms McInnes said.

“My mum rang me, she was in tears, and I could heard my dad crying in the background.

“She said: ‘They’ve got Sox.’

“I said: ‘What do you mean? Who?’ Mildura vet?

“It was crazy. Now it’s getting him back.”

RELATED: NT border to open to Sydney residents from October

THE RESCUE MISSION

Ms McInnes said Sox must have been pinched.

“There is no way that a cat could’ve walked that far unless he’s a little Superman cat,” she told news.com.au.

“He had to have been taken and dumped because the condition he was found in, he wasn’t looked after.

“He was skinny, he has an abscess on his right paw, he’s really frightened and very alert.”

However, the vet called on Thursday to say “he’s purring now” and – like many of us in COVID-19 lockdown – Sox has put on heaps of weight.

“We don’t know his story,” Ms McInnes said.

“I wish he could talk.”

But the find has been “bittersweet” because now the family are faced with a “waiting game” as the border between South Australia and Victoria holds firm.

“We can’t get him back,” Ms McInnes said.

“People aren’t even able to get to see their dying relatives across the border, or go to funerals, how are we supposed to get a little cat back?”

RELATED: Grieving daughter escorted by police to see father’s coffin

She said they have been peppered with suggestions to call police or border control but they are “not saying anything”.

There is the option of a courier but it’s expensive, requires insurance and comes with its risks.

“We’re not in a position to fork out money with coronavirus,” Ms McInnes said.

“We’re not confident of him being safe in a courier. I’ve heard a lot of courier dramas with animals.

“The vet is trying to see if they are able to drive to the border and we go down to the border, at Renmark or Yamba, and we just do a quick swap but you also have to do so much paperwork.”

Since August 28, a 40km “travel buffer zone” has been in place for cross border communities in Victoria and South Australia.

RELATED: SA could open border to NSW, ACT as early as next week

Ms McInnes said the “most logical plan” seems to be to pay for him to be boarded in Victoria until it reopens.

“But again, that’s a lot of money, every day hundreds of dollars,” she said.

“Who knows when the border is going to open?

“Tomorrow, two years, three months? No one knows.”

Ms McInnes said they are giving the Mildura vet “a bit of money just to keep him there”.

“They understand the situation and feeding him so he’s covered on that end,” she said.

“We just really want him home because eight months is a long time.”

Whatever the outcome, she said she will be driving straight to the border with her parents when she can.

“Mum and dad will be in the car crying,” she said.

“I just want to see him, I hope he jumps in our arms. I want a cuddle from our little lion.”

Ms McInnes said her mum is urging people to check their microchip details are up-to-date as her phone number had changed.



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Gum trees destroy home in Melbourne’s east as severe winds hit state


A family have narrowly survived after four gum trees destroyed their home in Melbourne’s east, as severe winds lashed parts of Victoria today.

The Cartwright family were asleep at their 30-year old property in the suburb of Millgrove Monday night when the wild weather, which saw gusts of up to 100km/h, forced trees to fall onto their home.

John Cartwright, his wife Jenny and their son Jaron narrowly escaped injury, with one tree missing their heads by a mere two metres.

RELATED: Australia told to brace for freak weather

RELATED: Polar opposite weather change due

“The bed is right next to window, so I was that close to getting sprayed with glass, but also inches off getting knocked out,” Jaron told Channel 9.

John said he heard a “just a big whoosh and a crash”, and was terrified his son had not survived the impact.

“I didn’t know whether he was hurt or not,” he said.

“All I could do was come up the stairs yelling his name, and I was so relieved when I heard him yelling back.”

Unfortunately the family’s “dream” home, which they hand built three decades ago, was completely destroyed.

It comes after Melbourne was hit by 100km/h winds on Monday and dealt with wild winds again throughout Tuesday.

The weather bureau earlier issued a severe weather warning for Tuesday for damaging winds averaging 50 to 70km/h with peak gusts of 100km/h.

Melbourne Airport was hit by a 100km/h gust just before midnight on Monday, while 93km/h winds were recorded at Essendon about 12.20am and an 83km/h gust hit St Kilda about 3.15am.

Across the state 107km/h winds were recorded at Mt William in the Grampians about 1.30am, while 106km/h gusts hit Mt Hotham just before 4am.

State Emergency Service volunteers responded to 386 requests for assistance in the 24 hours up until 11am on Tuesday.

A spokesman said more than 300 of the calls were for fallen trees.

Premier Daniel Andrews told reporters about 30,000 homes, mostly in Melbourne’s outer east, had lost power due to the damaging winds.

And it seems unruly weather is now headed toward NSW and southeast Queensland, with showers and storms to increase during the second half of the week as a trough makes its way north along the coast, according to the Bureau of Meteorology.



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You know who’s struggled most with home schooling? Me!


Socrates believed that all wisdom begins with an admission of ignorance. With the knowledge that one knows nothing. “I do not know,” begins Plato’s telling of Socrates’ great speech.

Victorian parents have faced the challenge of home schooling.

Victorian parents have faced the challenge of home schooling.Credit:Tanya Macheda

I’ve been thinking about this a lot in recent weeks because of a consistent feeling that, well, I know nothing. And the reason I have this feeling is because I’ve been trying to help my stepson Rafferty with his year 6 school work.

How many times have I looked at the question being asked on work sheets sent from the school and thought, jeez not sure I know the answer to that one? (This is a rhetorical question, readers, and you will not be tested on it.)

An exercise on decimals, for example, asks for answers to be displayed on a decimat. Hmm, OK. Are decimats a new thing, I wonder, confused, or was I away the day a teacher explained them in 1982? I try to get my head around them, but get distracted. I decide to colour my decimat in to make a yellow brick road, a daydreamy act that reminds me exactly why my own time at school was not a glittering parade of academic excellence.



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Amber alert issued for two children taken from an Ipswich home


The Queensland Police Service is seeking urgent public assistance to help locate two children who were taken from Redbank Plains, Ipswich around three hours ago and may be at significant risk.

The children, a 7-year-old girl and a 6-year-old boy, were taken by a woman from a residence on Warrill Street just before 4pm. It is believed she is travelling on foot and may be aided by another man.

The 7-year-old girl is described as having a dark complexion with dark dreadlocked hair. She is wearing a pink shirt, white skirt and black shoes.

The boy is described as having a dark complexion with short black hair. He is wearing a blue shift and tan pants.

The woman is described as having a dark complexion, around 150cm tall, of a proportionate build with black and purple hair. She was last seen wearing three-quarter-length camo pants, black shirt and stockings.

It is believed she is travelling on foot in the Ipswich and South Brisbane area. Police believe she may be also be aided by another man.



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Richmond AFL players Sydney Stack, Callum Coleman-Jones sent home from Queensland after Gold Coast brawl


Richmond players Sydney Stack and Callum Coleman-Jones will be sent home from Queensland and suspended for 10 matches after being arrested over an early morning brawl on the Gold Coast.

Stack and Coleman-Jones were arrested at 3:30am on Friday on a night out which put them in breach of the AFL’s strict COVID-19 biosecurity arrangements.

Queensland Police confirmed two men, aged 20 and 21, were arrested after a “physical altercation” on Orchid Avenue in Surfers Paradise.

Coleman-Jones sustained minor facial injuries and was treated in hospital. Stack was detained by police but was released a short time after without charges being laid. Both players were intoxicated.

The Tigers have been fined $75,000 as a result of the protocol breach, which the club said the two players would pay.

The club will pay an additional $25,000, which was suspended from a previous breach involving the wife of captain Trent Cotchin.

The AFL released a statement on Friday afternoon saying Stack and Coleman-Jones breached the league’s protocols by “taking an Uber, visiting a non-approved Gold Coast venue and becoming involved in an incident that involved Queensland Police”.

Richmond confirmed Stack and Coleman-Jones had been consuming alcohol at a club and an AFL-sanctioned event at its hub.

They chose to continue drinking at the completion of the function in their rooms, before going out and attending a venue.

A picture of a closed Kebab shop called Kebab Zone with a billboard for a strip club in the foreground
The incident involving Stack and Coleman-Jones occurred outside a kebab store in Surfers Paradise.(ABC News: Steve Keen)

“It is a privilege to be able to continue our competition, and with that privilege comes responsibility,” AFL general counsel Andrew Dillon said in a statement.

“The actions of the players are not only irresponsible but disrespectful to the competition and everyone associated with it.

“There is simply no excuse for this breach. The two players knew the rules and chose to ignore them, putting the safety of everyone at risk.

“The behaviour of the players is not what we expect, regardless of whether any protocols are in place or not.”

Tigers pair guilty of ‘serious mistakes’

Tigers chief executive Brendon Gale said Stack and Coleman-Jones had let down more than themselves.

“It’s extremely disappointing for our football club and extremely disrespectful to the entire AFL community and the leadership,” Gale said.

“It’s very disrespectful to the Queensland Government, who have been wonderful hosts in accommodating us as a football club and the entire competition.

Gale said Stack and Coleman-Jones needed to learn from the incident.

“We can’t forget these are young men, young people make mistakes, and these are very, very serious mistakes,” he said.

“They put our club at risk, put the competition at risk, the health and safety of the Queensland people.

“They’ll learn from it, but we need to put our arm around them and we need to help them regain the trust and respect of our football club and the community.”

The 10-match suspensions will begin in round 17, as the Tigers have a bye in round 16, and will stretch through to next season.

The $100,000 sanction will be included in Richmond’s 2021 soft cap.

Stack and Coleman-Jones were isolated after returning to Richmond’s accommodation base on the Gold Coast on Friday morning.

They had cleared a 14-day quarantine in July. They were not part of the current quarantine hub where AFL officials, and players and family members are undertaking the required 14-day quarantine period.

Brooke and Trent Cotchin, dressed to the nines, smile for a photo on the Brownlow Medal red carpet
Brooke Cotchin (left), pictured with her husband Trent, breached AFL protocols earlier this year.(AAP: Julian Smith)

It is Richmond’s second COVID breach of the season after Brooke Cotchin broke biosecurity protocols by travelling to a day spa on the Gold Coast in July.

The latest incident comes two days after Queensland was announced as host of the AFL grand final for the first time.

The Gabba will host the decider on October 24.

Richmond beat Fremantle on the Gold Coast on Wednesday at Carrara to move into the top four, having won its last four matches.

The Tigers’ next game is against fellow finals aspirants Geelong on Friday, September 11, also at Carrara.



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Dad asks missing 13-year-old to ‘come home’


The father of a 13-year-old girl who said she has been missing for five nights after she “met a stranger off Instagram” has pleaded for her to come home.

Steven Pickford dropped his daughter, Gabbriela Pickford off at her mother’s property in Kuraby, Brisbane on August 28 to stay the night.

“Her mood was fine, she didn’t seem like anything was up,” Mr Pickford told news.com.au on Tuesday night.

“This is completely out of character. She’s never spent more than one night away on her own and this is night five.

“She’s got no phone, she’s got no money, she’s got no clothes.

“She just suddenly left when everyone was in bed.”

The teenager’s mother called Mr Pickford at 11.30pm to report their daughter missing.

“Come home. Just come home,” he said through tears on Tuesday night.

“Where are you? Come home.”

Gabbriela’s parents say she downloaded Instagram on a sibling’s iPad while at her mother’s house.

Mr Pickford said his daughter’s mother had seen messages with a 17-year-old boy from the Logan area.

“I’ve got her phone, she didn’t take her phone to her mother’s house,” he said.

Mr Pickford said she doesn’t typically go to the area and it was “completely out of her circle of friends”.

“They don’t know this guy, they can’t find where she is,” he said.

Gabbriela is a Year Eight student at Runcorn State High School and did not show up on Monday or Tuesday.

She stays one night every fortnight at the home on St Andrew St in Kuraby but otherwise lives with Mr Pickford in Eight Mile Plains.

“She left at approximately 10pm (Friday),” her father said.

“She’s met a stranger off Instagram and other than that, we don’t know where she is or what she’s doing.”

Police require assistance to locate the 13-year-old.

If you have any information, you can call Policelink 24 hours a day on 131 444 and quote the reference number QP2001817912.

Alternatively, you can report information about Gabbriela to police via this link.



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