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Australian News

Teenager, 17, shot in in broad daylight


A teenager has be shot in the shoulder during a shocking daylight shooting in western Sydney.

Emergency services were called to Clyde St in South Granville at 1.40pm on Sunday following reports of gunshots.

A 17-year-old boy who suffered a gunshot wound to the shoulder was taken from the scene to Auburn Hospital.

He was later transferred to Westmead Hospital, where he was in a stable condition.

“This is something that concerns us and we are trying at this stage to ask people, witnesses who may have seen something, to contact us because that will be our best way to stop all this,” Chief Inspector Adam Phillips said.

Police are investigating the public shooting and are calling for anyone with information to contact Crime Stoppers or 1800 333 000.



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Local News - Victoria

Two people seriously injured in daylight assault


“It is believed two people have sustained serious injuries,” a spokesperson said.

“The exact circumstances are unknown and the investigation is ongoing.”

Ambulance Victoria said a man believed to be in his 40s was taken to The Alfred hospital in a serious condition after suffering upper body injuries.

Another man, believed to be in his 60s, was flown to The Alfred in a stable condition, also with an upper body injury.

In a separate incident, a teenager has died in hospital after he was stabbed in Corio last Sunday night.

The 18-year-old Bell Post Hill man was taken to hospital after an altercation between two groups of youths on Goulburn Avenue just after 6.30pm on August 23, police said.

A 16-year-old boy and an 18-year-old man were arrested nearby and charged with several offences, including intentionally cause serious injury, affray and commit indictable offence while on bail.

A third man, aged 19, was arrested on August 23 and has been charged with violent disorder, affray and commit indictable offence whilst on bail.

The matter is now being investigated by the homicide squad. The charges will be reviewed following the teenager’s death.



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News

Improving air circulation and allowing more natural daylight could keep coronavirus from spreading


The two simple ways to combat the spread of coronavirus in your office: Better air flow and more natural daylight may reduce transmission when employees return to work, report finds

  • A scientific review looked at two ways building designs can be adapted to prevent the spread of coronavirus when social distancing is over
  • One way is allowing more natural daylight in, which has many health benefits such as improving mood and warding off seasonal depression
  • Another suggestion is improving air circulation to increase the amount of outside air flowing in and dilute virus particles
  • In the US, there are more than 588,000 confirmed cases of the virus and more than 23,600 deaths
  • Learn more about how to help people impacted by COVID

Social distancing has kept at least one-third of Americans working from their homes for the last several weeks.

However, some businesses – such as grocery stores – remain open and, as the coronavirus pandemic abates, adults will have to head back to their workplaces.

A team, led by the University of California, Davis, says there are two ways that buildings can be healthier once people return. 

Researchers suggest that opening windows to improve air circulation and allowing more natural daylight in the office could help prevent the transmission of the virus. 

A report suggests one way to prevent coronavirus from spreading in offices once social distancing ends is by letting natural daylight in, which has many health benefits (file image)

A report suggests one way to prevent coronavirus from spreading in offices once social distancing ends is by letting natural daylight in, which has many health benefits (file image)

Another suggestion is improving air circulation to increase the amount of outside air flowing in, which can dilute virus particles. Pictured: EMTs bring a patient into Bronx Care Hospital Center, April 1

Another suggestion is improving air circulation to increase the amount of outside air flowing in, which can dilute virus particles. Pictured: EMTs bring a patient into Bronx Care Hospital Center, April 1

For the review, published in the journal mSystems, the team looked at how to use existing building designs to prevent the spread of the disease.

The authors say that sunlight will not kill off the virus, known as SARS-CoV-2, or that it is effective in fighting against it.

However, the health benefits of people getting sunlight daily make it an easy preventive tool. 

‘Daylight exists as a free, widely available resource to building occupants with little downside to its use and many documented positive human health benefits,’ researchers wrote in a university release.

Such health benefits include boosting levels of vitamin D, improving mood and warding off seasonal depression.

Another way for offices to keep their workers safe is to make sure buildings are well-ventilated. 

Virus particles are far too minuscule to be kept out of rooms by HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) and MERV (minimum efficiency reporting value) filters.

But the researchers suggest other ventilation strategies, such as opening windows when temperatures aren’t too low, which is known as ‘perimeter ventilation.’

The team notes that this method could cause virus particles that have settled on surfaces to accidentally be circulated again. 

However, opening windows increases the amount of outside air flowing in, which can help dilute virus particles that are indoors.

Virus particles spread fast in drier air so making sure that an office is more humid could help keep the workplace healthier.

This is because droplets are small in dry air, which make them travel further, but they are bigger in humid air, so they cannot travel as far. 

In the meantime, researchers say the best way to keep your home office safe is to practice social distancing when you go out, regularly wash your hands, keep your house well-lit and well-ventilated. 

In the US, there are more than 588,000 confirmed cases of the virus and more than 23,600 deaths.

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